Event

Drug Researchers' Roundtable – The Origins of Cocaine: Colonization and Failed Development in the Amazon Andes

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New York, NY

In the 1960s, the governments of Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia launched agricultural settlement programs in their vast Amazonian frontier lowlands. Two decades later, some territories within these zones had transformed into the centers of the illicit cocaine boom of the Americas.

In this conversation, Paul Gootenberg and Liliana M. Dávalos discuss their recent book, The Origins of Cocaine: Colonization and Failed Development in the Amazon Andes (Routledge 2018), and larger drug policy trends in the Americas. Drawing on concepts from history and scientific fields, The Origins of Cocaine explores how three countries with divergent mid-century political trajectories ended up with parallel outcomes in illicit frontier economies and cocalero cultures. Bringing together transnational, national, and local analyses, the volume provides an in-depth examination of the deep origins of drug economics in the Americas.

Speakers

  • Paul Gootenerg is SUNY Distinguished Professor of History and Sociology, chair of the History department at Stony Brook University, and is the author of Andean Cocaine: The Making of a Global Drug and co-author of The Origins of Cocaine: Colonization and Failed Development in the Amazon Andes.
  • Liliana M. Dávalos is a Professor of Conservation Biology at Stony Brook University. She has advised the United Nations Office of Drug and Crime on deforestation since 2007 and is a co-author of the 2016 World Drug Report and The Origins of Cocaine.